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Sunday, March 18, 2012

SUNDAY REVIEW /THE ROAD NOT TAKEN/Guest Blog/By Robert Frost


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

About the Author--Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was a popular American poet. Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. He spoke at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy.

Despite his later association with rural life, Frost grew up in the city, and published his first poem in his high school's magazine. Frost's poems are critiqued in the "Anthology of Modern American Poetry", Oxford University Press, where it is mentioned that behind a sometimes charmingly familiar and rural fa├žade.

Sources: Biography: Wikipedia; Poem is in public domain posted by Google.
Image: public domain, United States Postal Service via Wikipedia



SUNDAY REVIEW—A new online literary review appearing exclusively on Pillar to Post (www.tomshess.blogspot.com).

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