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Sunday, February 18, 2018


Chapter One.

EVERYBODY was drunk. The whole battery was drunk going
along the road in the dark. We were going to the Champagne.
The lieutenant kept riding his horse out into the fields and saying to him, “I’m drunk, I tell you, mon vieux. Oh, I am so soused.”

We went along the road all night in the dark and the adjutant kept riding up alongside my kitchen and saying, “You must put it out. It is dangerous. It will be observed.” We were 50 kilometers from the front but the adjutant worried about the fire in my kitchen. It was funny going along that road. That was when I was a kitchen corporal.


THE first matador got the horn through his sword hand and the
crowd hooted him out. The second matador slipped and the bull
caught him through the belly and he hung on to the horn with one hand and held the other tight against the place, and the bull
rammed him wham against the wall and the horn came out, and he lay in the sand, and then got up like crazy drunk and tried to slug the men carrying him away and yelled for his sword, but he fainted.
The kid came out and had to kill five bulls because you can’t have more than three matadors, and the last bull he was so tired he couldn’t get the sword in. He couldn’t hardly lift his arm. He tried five times and the crowd was quiet because it was a good bull and it looked like him or the bull and then he finally made it. He sat down in the sand and puked and they held a cape over him while the crowd hollered and threw things down into the bullring.


MINARETS stuck up in the rain out of Adrianople across the mudflats. The carts were jammed for 30 miles along the Karagatch road. Water buffalo and cattle were hauling carts through the mud. No end and no beginning. Just carts loaded with everything they owned. The old men and women, soaked through, walked along keeping the cattle moving. The Maritza was running yellow almost up to the bridge. Five carts were jammed solid on the bridge with camels bobbing along through them.

Greek cavalry herded along the procession. Women and kids were in the carts crouched with mattresses, mirrors, sewing machines, bundles. There was a woman having a kid with a young girl holding a blanket over her and crying. Scared sick looking at it. It rained all through the evacuation.

WE were in a garden at Mons. Young Buckley came in with his
patrol from across the river. The first German I saw climbed up
over the garden wall. We waited till he got one leg over and then
potted him. He had so much equipment on and looked awfully
surprised and fell down into the garden. Then three more came
over further down the wall. We shot them. They all came just like that.

IT was a frightfully hot day. We’d jammed an absolutely perfect
barricade across the bridge. It was simply priceless. A big old
wrought iron grating from the front of a house. Too heavy to lift
and you could shoot through it and they would have to climb over it. It was absolutely topping. They tried to get over it, and we potted them from forty yards. They rushed it, and officers came out alone and worked on it. It was an absolutely perfect obstacle. Their officers were very fine. We were frightfully put out when we heard the flank had gone, and we had to fall back.

THEY shot the six cabinet ministers at half-past six in the morning against the wall of a hospital. There were pools of water in the courtyard. There were wet dead leaves on the paving of the courtyard.

It rained hard. All the shutters of the hospital were nailed
shut. One of the ministers was sick with typhoid. Two soldiers carried him downstairs and out into the rain. They tried to hold him up against the wall but he sat down in a puddle of water.
The other five stood very quietly, against the wall. Finally the officer told the soldiers it was no good trying to make him stand up. When they fired the first volley he was sitting down in the water with his head on his knees.

NICK sat against the wall of the church where they had dragged
him to be clear of machine gun fire in the street. Both legs stuck
out awkwardly. He had been hit in the spine. His face was sweaty and dirty. The sun shone on his face. The day was very hot.

Rinaldi, big backed, his equipment sprawling, lay face down
against the wall. Nick looked straight ahead brilliantly. The pink
wall of the house opposite had fallen out from the roof, and an ironbedstead hung twisted toward the street. Two Austrian dead lay in the rubble in the shade of the house. Up the street were other dead. Things were getting forward in the town. It was going well.
Stretcher bearers would be along any time now. Nick turned his head carefully and looked down at Rinaldi. “Senta Rinaldi. Senta. You and me we’ve made a separate peace.”       

Rinaldi lay still in the sun breathing with difficulty. “Not patriots.”

Nick turned his head carefully away smiling sweatily.

Rinaldi was a disappointing audience.

WHILE the bombardment was knocking the trench to pieces at
Fossalta, he lay very flat and sweated and prayed oh jesus christ get me out of here. Dear jesus please get me out. Christ please please please christ. If you’ll only keep me from getting killed I’ll do anything you say. I believe in you and I’ll tell everyone in the world that you are the only thing that matters. Please please dear jesus.

The shelling moved further up the line. We went to work on the
trench and in the morning the sun came up and the day was hot
and muggy and cheerful and quiet. The next night back at Mestre he did not tell the girl he went upstairs with at the Villa Rossa about Jesus. And he never told anybody.

AT two o’clock in the morning two Hungarians got into a cigar
store at Fifteenth Street and Grand Avenue. Drevitts and Boyle
drove up from the Fifteenth Street police station in a Ford.

The Hungarians were backing their wagon out of an alley. Boyle shot one off the seat of the wagon and one out of the wagon box.
Drevetts got frightened when he found they were both dead. Hell
Jimmy, he said, you oughtn’t to have done it. There’s liable to be a hell of a lot of trouble.
         — They’re crooks ain’t they? said Boyle. They’re, wops ain’t they? Who the hell is going to make any trouble?
         — That’s all right maybe this time, said Drevitts, but how did you know they were wops when you bumped them?
         Wops, said Boyle, I can tell wops a mile off.

ONE hot evening in Milan11 they carried him up onto the roof
and he could look out over the top of the town. There were
chimney swifts in the sky. After a while it got dark and the searchlights came out. The others went down and took the bottles with them.

He and Ag could hear them below on the balcony. Ag sat
on the bed. She was cool and fresh in the hot night.
Ag stayed on night duty for three months. They were glad to
let her. When they operated on him she prepared him for the operating table and they had a joke about friend or enema. He went under the anæsthetic holding tight on to himself so that he would not blab about anything during the silly, talky time. After he got on crutches he used to take the temperature so Ag would not have to get up from the bed. There were only a few patients, and they all knew about it.

They all liked Ag. As he walked back along the
halls he thought of Ag in his bed.

Before he went back to the front they went into the Duomo
and prayed. It was dim and quiet, and there were other people
praying. They wanted to get married, but there was not enough
time for the banns, and neither of them had birth certificates.

They felt as though they were married, but they wanted everyone to know about it, and to make it so they could not lose it.

Ag wrote him many letters that he never got until after the armistice. Fifteen came in a bunch and he sorted them by the dates and read them all straight through. They were about the hospital, and how much she loved him and how it was impossible to get along without him and how terrible it was missing him at night.

After the armistice, they agreed he should go home to get a job
so they might be married. Ag would not come home until he had a good job and could come to New York to meet her. It was understood he would not drink, and he did not want to see his friends or anyone in the States. Only to get a job and be married.

On the train from Padova to Milan they quarreled about her not being willing to come home at once. When they had to say goodbye in the station at Padova they kissed goodbye, but were not finished with the quarrel. He felt sick about saying goodbye like that.

He went to America on a boat from Genoa. Ag went back to
Torre di Mosta to open a hospital. It was lonely and rainy there,
and there was a battalion of Arditi quartered in the town.

Living in the muddy, rainy town in the winter the major of the battalion made love to Ag, and she had never known Italians before, and finally wrote a letter to the States that theirs had been only a boy and girl affair.

She was sorry, and she knew he would probably not be able to understand, but might someday forgive her, and, be grateful to her, and she expected, absolutely unexpectedly, to be married in the spring. She loved him as always, but she realized now there’s was only a boy and girl love. She hoped he would have a
great career, and believed in him absolutely. She knew it was for
the best.

The Major did not marry her in the spring, or any other time.
Ag never got an answer to her letter to Chicago about it. A short
time after he contracted gonorrhea from a sales girl from The Fair riding in a taxicab through Lincoln Park.

IN 1919 he was traveling on the railroads in Italy carrying a square of oilcloth from the headquarters of the party written in indelible pencil and saying there was a comrade who had suffered very much under the whites in Budapest and requesting comrades to aid him in any way.

He used this instead of a ticket. He was very shy and quite young and the trainmen passed him on from one crew to
another. He had no money, and they fed him behind the counter
in railway eating houses.

He was delighted with Italy. It was a beautiful country he said.
The people were all kind. He had been in many towns, walked
much and seen many pictures. Giotto, Masaccio, and Piero della
Francesca, he bought reproductions of and carried them wrapped in a copy of Avanti.

Mantegna, he did not like.

He reported at Bologna, and I took him with me, up into the
Romagna where it was necessary I go to see a man. We had a good trip together. It was early September and the country was pleasant.

He was a Magyar, a very nice boy and very shy. Horthey’s men
had done some bad things to him. He talked about it a little. In
spite of Italy, he believed altogether in the world revolution.
         — But how is the movement going in Italy? he asked.
         — Very badly, I said.
         — But it will go better, he said. You have everything here. It is    the one country that everyone is sure of. It will be the starting point of everything.

At Bologna, he said good-bye to us to go on the train to Milano
and then to Aosta to walk over the pass into Switzerland. I spoke to him about the Mantegnas in Milano.
         -- No, he said, very shyly, he did not like the Mantegnas. I wrote out for him where to eat in Milano and the addresses of comrades.
         He thanked me very much, but his mind was already looking forward to walking over the pass. He was very eager to walk over the pass while the weather held good.

The last I heard of him the Swiss had him in jail near Sion.

THEY whack whacked the white horse on the legs and he knee-ed himself up. The picador twisted the stirrups straight and pulled and hauled up into the saddle. The horse’s entrails hung down in a blue bunch and swung backward and forward as he began to canter, the monos whacking him on the back of his legs with the rods. He cantered jerkily along the barrera.

He stopped stiff and one of the monos held his bridle and walked him forward. The picador kicked in his spurs, leaned forward and shook his lance at the bull.

Blood pumped regularly from between the horse’s front legs. He was nervously wobbly. The bull could not make up his mind to charge.

THE crowd shouted all the time and threw pieces of bread down
into the ring, then cushions and leather wine bottles, keeping up
whistling and yelling. Finally, the bull was too tired from so much bad sticking and folded his knees and lay down and one of the cuadrilla leaned out over his neck and killed him with the puntillo.

The crowd came over the barrera and around the torero and two
men grabbed him and held him and someone cut off his pigtail
and was waving it and a kid grabbed it and ran away with it.

Afterwards, I saw him at the café. He was very short with a brown face and quite drunk and he said after all it has happened before like that. I am not really a good bullfighter.

IF it happened right down close in front of you, you could see Villalta snarl at the bull and curse him, and when the bull charged he swung back firmly like an oak when the wind hits it, his legs tight together, the muleta trailing and the sword following the curve behind. Then he cursed the bull, flopped the muleta at him, and swung back from the charge his feet firm, the muleta curving and with each swing the crowd roaring.

When he started to kill it was all in the same rush. The bull
looking at him straight in front, hating. He drew out the sword
from the folds of the muleta and sighted with the same movement and called to the bull, Toro! Toro! and the bull charged and Villalta charged and just for a moment they became one.

Villalta became one with the bull and then it was over. Villalta standing straight and the red hilt of the sword sticking out dully between the bull’s shoulders.

Villalta, his hand up at the crowd and the bull roaring
blood, looking straight at Villatal and his legs caving.

I heard the drums coming down the street and then the fifes and
the pipes and then they came around the corner, all dancing.

The street full of them. Maera saw him and then I saw him. When they stopped the music for the crouch he hunched down in the street with them all and when they started it again he jumped up and went dancing down the street with them. He was drunk all right.

You go down after him, said Maera, he hates me.

So I went down and caught up with them and grabbed him
while he was crouched down waiting for the music to break loose and said, Come on Luis. For Christ sake, you’ve got bulls this afternoon.

He didn’t listen to me, he was listening so hard for the music
to start.

I said, Don’t be a damn fool Luis. Come on back to the hotel.

Then the music started up again and he jumped up and twisted
away from me and started dancing. I grabbed his arm and he pulled loose and said, Oh leave me alone. You’re not my father.

I went back to the hotel and Maera was on the balcony looking
out to see if I’d be bringing him back. He went inside when he
saw me and came downstairs disgusted.

Well, I said, after all he’s just an ignorant Mexican savage.

Yes, Maera said, and who will kill his bulls after he gets a cogida?

We, I suppose, I said.

Yes, we, said Maera. We kills the savages’ bulls, and the drunkards’ bulls, and the riau-riau dancers’ bulls.

Yes. We kill them. We kill them all right.

Yes. Yes. Yes.

MAERA lay still, his head on his arms, his face in the sand. He felt warm and sticky from the bleeding. Each time he felt the horn coming. Sometimes the bull only bumped him with his head. Once the horn went all the way through him and he felt it go into the sand. Someone had the bull by the tail. They were swearing at him and flopping the cape in his face. Then the bull was gone. Some men picked Maera up and started to run with him toward the barriers through the gate out the passageway around under the grandstand to the infirmary.

They laid Maera down on a cot and one of the men went out for the doctor. The others stood around. The doctor came running from the corral where he had been sewing up picador horses. He had to stop and wash his hands. There was a great shouting going on in the grandstand overhead. Maera, wanted to say something and found he could not talk.

Maera felt everything getting larger and larger and then smaller and smaller. Then it got larger and larger and larger and then smaller and smaller. Then everything commenced to run faster and faster as when they speed up a cinematograph film. Then he was dead.

 THEY hanged Sam Cardinella at six o’clock in the morning in the corridors of the county jail.

The corridor was high and narrow with tiers of cells on either side. All the cells were occupied. The men had been brought in for the hanging. Five men sentenced to be hanged were in the five top cells. Three of the men to be hanged were negroes. They were very frightened. One of the white men sat on his cot with his head in his hands. The other lay flat on his cot with a blanket wrapped around his head.

They came out onto the gallows through a door in the wall. There were six or seven of them including two priests. They were carrying Sam Cardinella. He had been like that since about four o’clock in the morning. While they were strapping his legs together two guards held him up and the two priests were whispering to him. “Be a man, my son,” said one priest. When they came toward him with the cap to go over his head: Sam Cardinella lost control of his sphincter muscle.

The guards who had been holding him up dropped him. They were both disgusted. “How about a chair, Will?” asked one of the guards.

“Better get one,” said a man in a derby hat. When they all stepped back on the scaffolding back of the drop, which was very heavy, built of oak and steel and swung on ball bearings,

Sam Cardinella was left sitting there strapped tight, the younger of the two priests kneeling beside the chair. The priest skipped back onto the scaffolding just before the drop fell.

THE king was working in the garden. He seemed very glad to see me. We walked through the garden. This is the queen, he said. She was clipping a rose bush.

Oh how do you do, she said. We sat down at a table under a big tree and the king ordered whiskey and soda. We have good whiskey anyway, he said. The revolutionary committee, he told me, would not allow him to go outside the palace grounds.

Plastiras is a very good man I believe, he said, but frightfully difficult. I think he did right by shooting those chaps. If Kerensky had shot a few men things might have been altogether different.

Of course, the great thing in this sort of an affair is not to be shot oneself! It was very jolly. We talked for a long time. Like all Greeks he wanted to go America.

For the complete 1924 version of In Our Time click here, including notes and modern-day analysis of the work.


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