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Friday, July 19, 2019

SPACE CADETS / HAIL, APOLLO 11

CBS Live Graphic day of landing
Today, the world turns its weary eyes—once more--on the first moon landing, 50 years ago today.  Documentaries abound on the Apollo 11 mission.  Here are just three that document one of mankind’s premier technological accomplishments.

PUBLIC BROADCASTING SYSTEM
NOVA/APOLLO’S SPACE MISSION  Click here.

NASA
APOLLO 11’S AMAZING SECOND-BY-SECOND MOON LANDING. Click here.


CNN
APOLLO 11 MOON LANDING IN PHOTOS.  Click here

CBS
LIVE BROADCAST OF APOLLO 11 LANDING WITH WALTER CRONKITE.  Click here.

NASA PHOTO OF BUZZ ALDRIN BY NEIL ARMSTRONG ON THE MOON, JULY 19-20, 1969






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Thursday, July 18, 2019

THE BREWSPAPER / SAN DIEGO'S THORN BREWERY ADDS MISSION HILLS TASTE ROOM—TOMORROW!





Thorn Brewing is almost ready to debut its Mission Hills tasting room to the drinking public. Located in a downstairs, street-facing suite at 4026 Hawk Street, the 1,400-square-foot satellite operation blends a bit of its homey OG North Park and more brand-driven Barrio Logan spots into one entity.

“The goal was to have it feel like Thorn but be different from both North Park and Barrio Logan,” says Thorn Brewing general manager Tom Kiely. “Mission Hills is more like North Park but a blend of what the neighborhood represents.”

Multi-toned hardwood floors form a foundation for tables and seating salvaged from an old La Jolla sushi restaurant, plus hi-tops and a 200-square-foot, thoughtfully designed, U-shaped bar. The latter features a designated ordering point directly across from the south entrance complete with a merch display and beer fridge with to-go beer. Kiely says they wanted to make it easy on people to get a beer during busy periods so customers wouldn’t have to wade through droves of people to get a beer. With beer in-hand, guests can sit inside. The interior is equipped with three TV sets and a wallpapered “lounge area” along the west wall with a coffee table and three Skee-Ball banks.


They may also opt to imbibe al fresco on a 150-square-foot patio area accessible via a roll-up door. It, like all of the tasting room’s doors and windows, is a new installation. Additionally, Thorn has painted the exterior of the building and upgraded a gated entrance off Hawk Street to feature an appealing, decorative metal pattern. The Mission Hills tasting room will be open daily from 12 to 10 p.m. A grand-opening event is scheduled for Friday, July 19 (some friends-and-family practice services will precede that in the days prior). That soiree will feature the release of 500-milliliter bottles of Framboise de Tatas, a sour ale with raspberries originally brewed in support of the Keep A Breast Foundation’s annual Brewbies beer festival. Additionally, neighboring restaurant Fort Oak will produce a direct-service menu that will provide a quality food option at the new tasting room.


Wednesday, July 17, 2019

RETRO FILES / HISTORY KNOCKS AT THE DOORS OF TWO NORTH PARK HOMES





A recent Save Our Heritage Organisation newsletter reported two North Park homes were named by the City of San Diego Historical Resources Board as historical resources.  For the complete list click here.


3430 Utah Street (above) in North Park has a 1926 period of significance and was designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style. Features include the asymmetrical façade with parapet and low- pitch tile-covered roof, front entry porch with arch openings, arched focal windows, decorative grille work, and wood-framed windows. Designated under Criterion C, this resource embodies the distinctive characteristics of the style.


3020 Dale Street in the North Park community was constructed in 1920 and is the notable work of Master Builder, Edward Bryans. Features include the exterior patterned wood siding, low pitch gable roof with a partial-width front porch, exposed roof beams, wood sash and transom windows, and stuccoed porch piers. Designated under Criterion C, for exemplary architecture of the Arts and Crafts era, this bungalow is also designated under Criterion D, as the representative work of a Master Builder.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

URBAN EXPLORER / ISTANBUL LOVES ITS CATS





Original photography by PillartoPost.org. 

Hundreds of thousands of cats have roamed the metropolis of Istanbul freely for thousands of years, wandering in and out of people's lives, impacting them in ways only an animal who lives between the worlds of the wild and the tamed can. Cats and their kittens bring joy and purpose to those they choose, giving people an opportunity to reflect on life and their place in it. In Istanbul, cats are the mirrors to ourselves.


A recent article in The Economist points out Turkey is not unique among predominately Muslim countries for honoring its cats, which are considered ritually clean animals in Islam. In the hadith, the collected sayings, and actions of Muhammad, there are numerous examples of the Prophet’s fondness for cats.


By one account, Muhammad cut off his sleeve when he had to rise for prayers so as to not disturb a feline that had curled up on his robe for a nap. In another tale, the pet cat of Abu Hurayrah (literally “father of the kitten”) saved Muhammad from an attack by a deadly serpent. Muhammad purportedly blessed the cat in gratitude, giving cats the ability to always land on their feet. Cats were considered guardians in other respects for the Islamic world: they defended libraries from destruction by mice and may have helped protect city populations from rat-borne plagues.


Istanbul is made for the cat-obsessed on social media. A “Cats of Istanbul” Facebook page has over 66,000 followers, and on Instagram, iconic Istanbul scenery frames photogenic felines. In October, the Kadikoy district memorialized a cat named Tombili with a bronze statue following an online campaign. Tombili had become an Internet sensation after a photo showed the rotund cat lounging on the street, one paw jauntily hanging off a step. A mosque on the city’s Asian side also made headlines after photos circulated of cats at home among worshippers. The kindly imam, Mustafa Efe, welcomes strays with open arms.



ESPIONAGE / IF THIS DOESN’T PISS YOU OFF—YOU’RE NUMB. HOW WIKILEAKS MEDDLED.


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CNN GRAPHIC


BREAKING NEWS

CNN will air an exclusive report TONIGHT revealing how Wikileaks founder Assange turned an embassy into a command post for election meddling.

Story airs tonight on CNN at 6 pm ET and/or 8 pm ET

CNN background: Click here.

Monday, July 15, 2019

$$$$$ / AVOID THESE EMOTIONAL MISTAKES WHEN INVESTING



 GUEST BLOG / By: Scott Thoma, CFA, CFP®, Principal, EDWARD JONES--While market volatility and investment performance can affect your success toward your important long-term goals, your own emotions can become the biggest roadblock. Here are three mistakes people often make when their emotions get in the way of their investment strategy – and how you can avoid them.

Mistake No. 1: Heading to – or staying on – the sidelines
Too often investors are tempted to head to the sidelines when the news looks bad. Whether it’s the economy, tariff or trade war concerns, or market fluctuations, there is no shortage of headlines that could distract you from your long-term goals.

Some investors try to avoid potential stock market declines by selling investments and moving to cash. But in order to time the market successfully, you have to get two decisions right: when to get out, and when to get back in. Getting one right is difficult, and getting two right is nearly impossible.

Other investors may hold too much in cash, thinking they are avoiding risk. But this could actually increase the risk of not having enough growth in their portfolio to meet their goals or outpace inflation.

What to do instead
When negative events occur, the media often use extreme language or highlight low periods in the past for dramatic effect. The key is, do these ever-changing headlines really affect your long-term goals? Investors have successfully navigated tough periods in the markets before. You’re better off focusing on your long-term goals and not the latest headline.

Mistake No. 2: Chasing performance
When the media hype the latest “hot” investment or highlight “dramatic” declines in the market, investors are often tempted to chase the winners and sell the losers. But this emotional response can lead to buying investments at market peaks and selling them at the bottoms – a recipe for underperformance.

What to do instead
Instead of trying to find the next hot investment, you should stay invested with a diversified portfolio specifically tailored for your situation and long-term goals.

Also, be sure you understand the purpose of your investments. For example, if you’re retired, some investments provide income today, while others help provide income down the road. But each serves a critical role in ensuring your money lasts as long as you need it.

Since each one serves a different role, each may be outperforming and underperforming at different times.  While diversification cannot guarantee a profit or protect against loss in a declining market, it can help smooth out market ups and downs, so don’t chase performance.

Mistake No. 3: Focusing on the short term
While it’s important to look at the long term, day-to-day fluctuations can obscure your view of success. For example, in 2008, some investors sold off after their portfolios fell from all-time highs. But if they had looked at their long-term performance instead, they may still have been on track toward their important long-term goals.

What to do instead
While market declines can be unpleasant, they’re in fact a normal part of investing. In fact, on average, the stock market has a decline of 10% about once a year. Your measurement of success should be your progress toward your long-term goals rather than any day-to-day fluctuations.

A short-term market decline or the latest media headline doesn’t change your long-term goals. It helps if you can review your goals and objectives, recognize behaviors that could cause trouble, and as always, work with your financial advisor to help you focus on your progress toward your goals and avoid making emotional investment decisions.